[ dmg . publications . DAM: Digital Animation Museum ] edit
Julie Chen
published in 2002 in M Arch. Thesis, University of Washington [pdf]
abstract:
The interaction of architecture and technology is, to many, simply a relationship between a building and the materials from which it is constructed. This thesis, however, explores the notion that architectural spaces and forms are influenced not only by construction technology, but also by everyday technology that we use to better our lives, and particularly focuses on the potential impact of wireless information technology on architecture. This thesis asserts that the implementation of information technology in architecture encourages greater interactivity between building and visitor and also increases flexibility in spatial programming. By incorporating wireless information technology as an essential design element of a museum, traditional notions of control points can be eliminated, and the building experience may be manipulated in a variety of ways to interact with and respond to visitor interests and preferences. In this way, both building and visitors are able to collaborate to produce a unique and individualized experience of the building space.
last updated 7.30.2002 by Ellen Yi-Luen Do